Monday, 20 April 2015

pistachio madeleines


I'm so mad for madeleines, especially fresh from the oven, dunked in something, preferably sticky, then dipped in nuts... I made these last week, right before we headed off up the coast for a week of family time on the beach. Half were baked in a cute vintage cast iron pan, the rest in my new favourite pan. The vintage pan, not such a good idea. The little cakes had black rusty butts, we trimmed them and ate them anyway, still delicious.
The shells i dunked in passionfruit curd then lightly pressed into an emerald mound of chopped pistachios. We packed them in tupperware and I nursed them on my knee all the way to our coffee stop at Taree. Emerald incidentally is the birthstone for May, a question we failed to answer at Wednesday night trivia at the Port Macquarie golf club. Our 15 year wedding anniversary, parmies and trivia with 6 kids in Port :)

I'm not done experimenting with madeleines and nuts; maybe some praline or popcorn, definitely more caramel, would peanuts or macadamias with smoked salt caramel be a step too far?


pistachio madeleines

15g melted butter, for greasing the tray
15g four, for flouring the tray
155g caster sugar 
155g melted butter, cooled
80g flour, sifted
110g shelled, unsalted pistachios
3 jumbo eggs (approx 200g)

• grease and flour the madeleine tin
• put the eggs in the bowl of a stand mixer if you have one, or use a hand held electric mixer, add the sugar and whip until thick and pale
• put the flour and 80g pistachios in a food processor, blitz until the nuts are finely ground, then gently fold into the eggs/sugar
• add the melted butter, mix until combined
• cover the surface with plastic wrap and refrigerate for anywhere between 2 hours and overnight
• when you're ready to bake, preheat the oven to 180ºC
• using a piping bag, pipe the batter into the trays, filling each shell 3/4 full, if you don't have a piping bag just use a couple of spoons
• bake in the centre of your oven for 12-15 mins, the madeleines should be brown and crisp around the edges, and spring back when lightly pressed in the centre
• while the madeleines are baking, roughly chop the remaining 30g pistachios
• tip the little cakes onto a cooling rack,  allow to cool for five minutes or so
• dip the base of each cake in passionfruit curd, then press into the chopped nuts, then pop into your mouth!
• uneaten madeleines should be stored in an airtight container, they will keep for a few days, but are best eaten the day they are baked
• click here for the passionfruit curd recipe

Thursday, 9 April 2015

hazelnut browned butter madeleines with whiskey caramel


Last week afforded the absolute perfect occasion for baking these little cakes. JJ from 84th and 3rd was just back from Japan having totally aced the madeleine tin challenge. I've been hunting high and low for a particular scallop shaped baking tin for a couple of years, I knew it came from Japan, but no amount of internet scouring could source it. JJ found Kappabashi St, the madeleine tin and kitchen equipment heaven. There's a girl's trip in the planning :)

Sunday was a pretty amazing day; my house was full of wonderful, creative women, a car load of beautiful props, endless conversation and baked goods. Even the kids were well behaved despite their chocolate high. We baked, photographed, shared stories, and surprisingly ate! I'll post all the recipes eventually, but for today, with autumn finally here and cup of tea in hand, these hazelnut madeleines are just perfect.


hazelnut madeleines

15g melted butter, for greasing the tray
15g four, for flouring the tray
155g caster sugar 
155g butter
80g flour, sifted
80g hazelnut meal
3 jumbo eggs (approx 200g)
1tbsp frangelico

• melt the butter over a gentle heat, keep heating until the butter turns golden brown, and smells gorgeously nutty with hints of caramel, remove from the heat and pour into a bowl, this stops the cooking and prevents the butter burning, leave to cool a little
• put the eggs in the bowl of a stand mixer if you have one, or use a hand held electric mixer, add the sugar and whip until thick and pale
• add the flour and ground hazelnuts and gently fold in
• add the frangelico and melted butter, mix until combined
• cover the surface with plastic wrap and refrigerate for somewhere between 2 hours and overnight
• when you're ready to bake, preheat the oven to 180ºC
• using a piping bag, pipe the batter into the trays, filling each shell 3/4 full, if you don't have a piping bag just use a couple of spoons
• bake in the centre of your oven for 12-15 mins, the madeleines should be brown and crisp around the edges, and spring back when lightly pressed in the centre
• tip the little cakes onto a cooling rack,  allow to cool for five minutes or so
• dip the base of each cake in the whiskey caramel then press into the chopped nuts, consume as soon as possible!



whiskey caramel

200g caster sugar
80g butter
120 ml thickened cream 
1 tablespoon whiskey
1 tsp sea salt flakes, optional 

• tip the sugar into a small/medium heavy based pan and heat on a medium to high setting, stirring until the sugar starts to melt
• continue to cook, swirling the pan occasionally, until the sugar has melted, turned a lovely caramel colour and has started to smoke; things can be a bit tricky here, you want to cook the caramel enough to develop that deep toasted flavour that offsets the sweetness, but it's a very fine line, leave it too long and it will burn and become inedibly bitter, as always, practise, practise, practise...
• as soon as you are happy with the caramel, whisk in the butter, take care, it will bubble and spit 
• remove from the heat and whisk in the cream, if your caramel has formed clumps, return to the heat and stir until smooth
• off the heat add the whiskey and salt flakes, pour into a clean jar and leave to cool
• once cool, cover with the lid and store in the fridge, it will keep for 2 weeks

roasted hazelnuts

100g hazelnuts

• preheat your oven to 180ºC
• put the nuts onto a baking tray and roast for 10-12 minutes, until the skins have darkened and started to split
• tip the nuts into the centre of a clean tea towel, gather up the edges and gently rub the nuts together
• remove as much of the skin as possible as it can be bitter
• roughly chop, store in an airtight container until required



Thursday, 2 April 2015

chocolate hazelnut sponge




It's April already! Can you believe it? Things have been a bit hectic since I last posted waaaay back in November, hectic and stressful. We renovated the house, in November and December I worked a few days a week in an amazing bakery, there was Christmas, a ski trip in Canada... Well, I'm back, it was my birthday at the weekend, so here I am with cake.

Chocolate and hazelnut are such a perfect combination, so hard to beat. I probably make a version of this cake every year.  This year the sponge is light, the filling is rich and there are flowers, flowers, it's just so pretty. There are also cupcakes, bunnies bathing in salted caramel atop pillowy buttercream mounds, it's almost Easter, so totally excusable.  Hopefully I'll get around to posting them too, if only that delicious, evil sauce.

I used to be really suspicious of social media, of meeting people online, particularly meeting people online, I'm a child of the seventies... How can it be safe? How? I took a "real life, met in the traditional manner" friend along to my first instameet. Instagram has been amazing, I've met so many lovely, incredibly talented people. 

Before it was my birthday cake, this cake was a tempting prop. My totally sane, new insta friend Rebecca from Chu Chu came over with her beautiful ceramics, the lovely Emma brought foraged flowers and styling awesomeness, we hung out, took photographs and ate cake.

chocolate hazelnut sponge

165g plain flour
25g cocoa powder
50g ground hazelnuts (hazelnut meal)
80g butter  
7 jumbo, or 8 large, eggs at room temperature
200g sugar
150g hazelnuts, roasted and skinned (see below)

• preheat oven to 160ºC, butter and flour two 20cm cake tins
melt the butter in a small pan over a gentle heat, allow to cool (feel free to use the microwave, if a small child hasn't set fire to it attempting to pop corn...)
• tip flour, cocoa powder and ground hazelnuts into a food processor, blitz for 30 seconds then repeat
• sieve the mixture over a large bowl, if there is more than a teaspoon of nut rubble left in your sieve, repeat the processing stage, sieve your nut/flour/cocoa mix twice more
• using an electric mixer, preferably a stand mixer so you don't run the risk of RSI, whisk the eggs and sugar until pale and thick, this will take between 6 and 8 minutes...
• sift a third of the four mix over the eggs/sugar, fold in gently using a metal spoon; repeat twice more with the remaining flour 
gently fold in the melted butter, make sure to lift the mixture from the bottom of the bowl as the butter will pool there
• divide your mix evenly between the tins, bake in the centre of the oven for 20-25 minutes, when cooked the cake will have shrunk away from the side of the tin, the centre will spring back when gently pressed
• gently run a knife around the inside of the tins and turn the cakes onto a cooling rack
to roast your hazelnuts; tip the nuts onto a baking tray and pop them into the oven after you remove the cake, roast for 10-15 minutes until the skins have darkened and started to split. Place the nuts in a clean tea towel, gently rub the together. Remove as much of the skin as possible, it can taste bitter

ganache filling

175g dark chocolate
125ml cream

• finely chop the chocolate, put into a small heatproof bowl
• heat the cream in a small pan until just simmering, simmer for 1 minute then pour over the chocolate, do not stir, let stand for 5 minutes
• stir cream and chocolate until smooth and glossy
• cool at room temperature until it is thick enough to pipe, think smooth peanut butter; you can put it in the fridge to speed the process up, but the ganache will lose some of its gloss

cream filling

300ml whipping cream
1 tbsp caster sugar
30ml frangelico

combine ingredients in a bowl and whip until thick, soft and pillowy

to construct the cake

• set aside 2 tablespoons of roasted hazelnuts, roughly chop half
• choose the neatest cake, keep this for the top layer
• place the bottom cake layer on your serving plate, spread with a thick layer of ganache (reserving some for decoration) then scatter over the whole hazelnuts
• spoon roughly 2/3 cream onto the centre of your cake, gently spread outwards, stopping just short of the edge; when you add your top layer it will squish the cream to the edge
• gently top with the other layer, bottom side up
• dust with cocoa; decorate using the remaining ganache, chopped and whole hazelnuts and any flowers you are confident will not poison your guests!I piped little mounds of ganache in a rough crescent, sprinkled the chopped then whole nuts around and between, finally adding some violas from the garden.
• serve with a scoop of ice-cream and any left over cream.






Thursday, 13 November 2014

Chocolate macarons with yuzu curd


I'd pretty much decided not to post macarons again for a while, if ever; mostly people are over them, they're everywhere, even in McDonald's. I still love them with their neatness and symmetry, such a perfect blank canvass for flavour tinkering.  A very lovely person recently called me the "macaron whisperer" and I thought f*#% it, go with what you love, so here's another macaron post.

Chocolate and citrus work so beautifully together; I'm a chocolate orange girl, a gorgeous friend's favourite gelato combo is chocolate and lemon, passionfruit might as well be a citrus fruit and it works perfectly with chocolate. I've been on a bit of a yuzu bender of late, so here we have chocolate yuzu macarons. If you're over macarons maybe just make the yuzu curd, it's a beautiful thing :)

If fresh yuzus are available here in Sydney I haven't found them, but we have a great Japanese supermarket that sells bottled yuzu juice. Now if bottled yuzu juice follows the same pattern as bottled lemon and lime juice, the fresh stuff must be pretty damn amazing. Yuzu are beautifully fragrant and taste decidedly citrusy, somewhere between a mandarin and a grapefruit. So far I've just made the curd, but I'm thinking yuzu sorbet or mousse would be awesome. Roll on mid December when I may actually have a kitchen to bake in...

macaron shells

75g egg white
90g ground almonds
90g icing sugar
20g cocoa powder
100g caster sugar
25ml water

• line 2 baking trays with baking paper
• combine the caster sugar and water in a small, heavy based pan and set aside
• put the ground almonds, icing sugar and cocoa powder in a blender and blitz on the pulse setting for a minute or so • push the nut powder through a sieve into a large bowl, if you have a small amount that won't be pushed through the sieve just toss it out, any more than a teaspoon and it's worth repeating the blitzing stage
• divide the egg white in half, use scales for this stage, you may need to lightly beat the egg white with a fork to break it up • put half in the bowl of a stand mixer, set the other half aside
• over a low heat stir the sugar and water until the sugar dissolves • increase heat to high and bring the syrup to a boil, it's ok to swirl the pan but do not stir (!) • use a wet pastry brush to remove any crystals that form on the side of the pan • check the temperature with a sugar thermometer, you are aiming for 118ºC, but when the temperature reaches 110ºC whisk the egg whites until firm peaks form
• when the sugar syrup reaches 118ºC turn the mixer to low and slowly pour into the bowl, once all the syrup is in, turn the speed to high and whisk until cool
• pour the unbeaten egg white over the nut/sugar/cocoa powder, tip the meringue on top and using a spatula, mix together in a circular motion, lifting the batter from underneath • this method takes a bit of mixing, the batter is ready when a ribbon of batter falls from your spatula and disappears back into the mix within 20-30 seconds
• use a spot of batter under the corners of the baking paper to stick it to the trays
• fit a piping bag with a 10mm nozzle and fill with the batter • pipe 3cm rounds, about 2cm apart, onto the baking paper • tap the trays on the bench, turn through 90º and tap again
• preheat the oven to 150ºC while the macarons rest on the bench for half an hour or so
• bake for 18 minutes, lightly push a macaron from the side, if it moves away from the ruffled foot around the base put them back in the oven for another couple of minutes, then check again
• cool on the tray for a few minutes then transfer to a cooling rack
• pair each shell with a similar sized partner; pipe a circle of ganache filling on the underside of one shell, fill the hollow centre with yuzu curd and gently press its partner on top
• store in an airtight container in the fridge overnight
• allow to come to room temperature to eat and enjoy!!

chocolate ganache

175g dark chocolate (or a 50/50 combination of milk and dark)
125ml cream

• chop the chocolate into small pieces and put in a heat proof bowl 
 heat cream in a small pan until just simmering, allow to simmer for a minute then pour over the chocolate 
 leave for 5 minutes, do not stir! 
 stir cream and chocolate together until smooth and glossy
 cool at room temperature until it is thick enough to pipe, a similar consistency as smooth peanut butter, you can put it in the fridge to speed the process up, but the ganache will lose its gloss




Yuzu Curd

2 eggs 

2 egg yolks
150g caster sugar
80g cold butter
70ml yuzu juice

• whisk the eggs, yolks and sugar together then tip into a small pan with the yuzu juice and butter

• heat gently, stirring constantly, until the butter has melted and the mixture has thickened (enough to coat the back of a spoon)
• strain the curd through a sieve into a sterilised jar, cover the top with cling wrap as it cools to prevent a skin forming
• seal the jar and store in the fridge for up to two weeks












Sunday, 26 October 2014

Blood Orange Hazelnut Cake















Yes, that's a lovely photo of a very pretty cake, but there's more, the cringe inducing tale of a truly awful pavlova...

It's been just over a year since the orange chiffon cake made its debut at a family get together, Mr B's grandfather's 95th birthday lunch; this I realised when my MIL asked if I'd make dessert for Pa's 96th. Mr B's mum was flicking through the September issue of the Gourmet Traveller and selected a gorgeous looking blood orange and hazelnut cake, chosen not simply for its beauty, but for its appeal to the older generation.

Guest numbers grew, a cake alone would not do; something reliable, tested, that i could bake with my eyes closed was needed as back up. Pavlova, passionfruit curd, raspberries, simple, delicious. I made the cake and passionfruit curd the night before, hopped up early the next morning feeling pretty smug to make the pavlova. Total fricken disaster. Worst pavlova I've made in my LIFE. I'm guessing what I thought was cornflour probably wasn't. It looked kind of okay, a bit grainy, maybe a hint of grey. Pavlovas are great, heaped with fruit and cream they are pretty forgiving, not this pav. Just prior to serving I topped it with passionfruit curd, pillows of cream and a gorgeous mound of matt raspberries. It looked pretty amazing for about 5 minutes until it slowly collapsed into an extremely expensive raspberry and passionfruit puddle. In a typical twist of irony most guests went with the puddle. Family are forgiving, but there was no hiding, it was awful.

The blood orange and hazelnut cake, it was good, as lovely as the photo in the magazine, a refined pineapple upside down cake for a new generation. It was straightforward to make, I may have bought the wrong polenta, my batter was strange, not quite curdled but definitely different! It baked like a dream, came out of the pan without a hitch and looked amazing. Click here for the original recipe, I followed it pretty closely just a slight reduction in the sugar content.  I poured the extra syrup over the cake before we cut slices, don't do that, it was super sweet and left the cake a bit wet in the centre. Next time I'll switch the ground hazelnuts for almonds, I think it may even be better.

Blood Orange topping

200 caster sugar
125ml freshly squeezed and strained blood orange juice
2 blood oranges

• butter a 25 cm spring form cake pan and line the base with baking paper
• finely slice the blood oranges, I used a mandolin but completely understand if this freaks you out, I have the scar and slight loss of feeling in my right index finger...
• tip the sugar and juice into a medium pan, stir over a low heat until the sugar dissolves
• add the orange slices to the pan, simmer gently for 10 minutes until the skins are tender
• cool the slices in the pan, then remove, reserving the syrup, arrange the slices on the base of the cake tin, pour over 100ml of the reserved syrup, pour the rest into a jug to serve with the cake



Blood Orange and Hazelnut cake

350g caster sugar
300g butter
6 large eggs
260g ground hazelnuts
150g fine polenta
150g plain flour
zest and juice of 1 blood orange
zest and juice of 1 lemon
blood orange juice
125ml buttermilk

• preheat your oven to 180ºC and leave your ingredients to come to room temperature
• cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy
• combine the hazelnuts and polenta in a bowl, add half to the creamed butter and sugar
with the mixer on medium speed, add the eggs one at a time, making sure each is fully incorporated before you add the next, scraping the mixture from the side of the bowl as you go
• add the remaining ingredients and fold carefully to combine
• spoon the mixture carefully over the sliced oranges, smoothing the top with the back of your spoon
• bake in the centre of your oven for 1 hour, test with a skewer or cake tester, it should come out clean
• cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then carefully turn out of the tin and leave on a rack until completely cooled

serve slices of the cake with greek yoghurt or whipped cream, warm the extra syrup for the sweet tooths! The cake will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for 4 days

Thanks AGT for the recipe, it's a wonderful cake; and because it's spring, here's a pretty, floral shot with a few of my favourite things :)



Monday, 13 October 2014

Macaron Ice Cream Sandwiches

A few weeks ago, over on instagram, I flippantly asked Erika Raxworthy to come over and bake with me; Erika thought it was a great idea, there may even have been an emoji, a flamenco dancing chica! I hadn't remotely expected my offer to be taken up, so there you go, sometimes you just have to ask. Emails were exchanged, plans were hatched, and a macaron ice-cream sandwich date was set.  


Erika's blog and instagram images are clean, uncluttered and super elegant. In person Erika is super elegant and just lovely; clean too, but that sounds really creepy... We had lots of fun making and shooting the ice cream sandwiches, it was quite warm and things got messy pretty quickly! The images below I took the next day when it was a little cooler, my daughter constructing and all the kids eating! For the shots taken on the day head over to Erika's blog

I made macarons in two flavours, hazelnut and chocolate. I attempted to make shells using coconut meal, laughingly awful, definitely need to overhaul that recipe! If you are making macarons for the first time it will likely be frustrating, but remember they'll taste great even if they are cracked or wonky, have no feet, look like mini erupting volcanoes...Our sandwiches were filled with pre cut and refrozen doughnut shaped discs of ice-cream; firstly because I was worried the shells would crack if we attempted to squish scoops of ice-cream between them, but mostly because I'm a neat freak when it comes to macarons.  It turned out to be completely unfounded from the squishing side of things; my kids made their own after dinner last night, with giant balls of ice-cream, and the shells held up just fine. Neat, no, lots of fun, yes. I'll definitely make these again, they'd be fantastic after a relaxed lunch or casual dinner, a perfect "make your own" dessert. The sweet answer to the taco. 




Hazelnut Macaron Shells

75g egg white (from approximately 2 jumbo eggs)
50g ground hazelnuts (hazelnut meal)
50g ground almonds (almond meal)
100g icing sugar
25ml water

 line 1 large baking tray with baking paper
 combine the caster sugar and water in a small, heavy based pan and set aside
 put the ground hazelnuts, ground almonds and icing sugar in a blender and blitz on the pulse setting for a minute or so • push the nut powder through a sieve into a large bowl, if you have a small amount that won't be pushed through the sieve just toss it out, any more than a teaspoon and it's worth repeating the blitzing stage or embrace it and go for a more rustic macaron
 divide the egg white in half, use scales for this stage, you may need to lightly beat the egg white with a fork to break it up(for 2 eggs I crack and weigh each egg white separately, they are usually a consistent weight, but if you double/triple the recipe I'd weigh once then divide in half) put half in the bowl of a stand mixer, set the other half aside
 over a low heat stir the sugar and water until the sugar dissolves • increase heat to high and bring the syrup to a boil, it's ok to swirl the pan but do not stir (!) • use a wet pastry brush to remove any crystals that form on the side of the pan • check the temperature with a sugar thermometer, you are aiming for 118ºC, but when the temperature reaches 110ºC whisk the egg whites until firm peaks form
 when the sugar syrup reaches 118ºC turn the mixer to low and slowly pour into the bowl, once all the syrup is in, turn the speed to high and whisk until cool
 pour the unbeaten egg white over the nut/sugar powder, tip the meringue on top and using a spatula, mix together in a circular motion, lifting the batter from underneath • this method takes a bit of mixing, the batter is ready when a ribbon of batter falls from your spatula and disappears back into the mix within 20-30 seconds
• use a spot of batter under the corners of the baking paper to stick it to the trays
• fit a piping bag with a 10mm nozzle and fill with the batter • pipe 6cm rounds, about 2cm apart, onto the baking paper, you should make approximately 12  • tap the tray on the bench, turn through 90º and tap again
• preheat the oven to 150ºC while the macarons rest on the bench for half an hour or so
• bake for 22 minutes, lightly push a macaron from the side, if it moves away from the ruffled foot around the base put them back in the oven for another couple of minutes, then check again
• cool on the tray for a few minutes then transfer to a cooling rack
• pair each shell with a similar sized partner and store in an airtight container until you are ready to use them.
• store unused shells in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Chocolate Macaron Shells



75g egg white
90g ground almonds
90g icing sugar
20g cocoa powder
100g caster sugar
25ml water

follow the method for the hazelnut shells above, adding the cocoa powder to the ground almonds and icing sugar when you blend.



You could stop at simply ice-cream in your sandwich, but who does that? Add what ever you like really, or just make these; salted caramel, chocolate ganache and sour cherry compote. You're welcome :)

Salted Caramel

200g granulated sugar (white sugar)
60ml water
125ml cream
1tsp sea salt flakes

in a small pan combine the sugar and water 
 stir over low heat to dissolve the sugar  increase heat and bring to boil, do not stir 
 use a wet pastry brush to dissolve any crystals that form on the sides of the pan 
 boil until the caramel is medium amber colour, swirl the pan occasionally but no stirring! 
 remove from heat, add the cream and sea salt, prepare for frantic bubbling, stir until combined 
 return to the heat, stirring continuously for 1 minute
 allow to cool at room temperature
 store unused caramel in an airtight container for up to a month 

Chocolate Ganache

175g of your favourite chocolate, no soft centres
125ml thickened cream

 finely chop the chocolate and tip into a heat proof jug or bowl
• bring the cream to a boil in a small saucepan then pour over the chocolate, stir once or twice to ensure the chocolate is covered then walk away
 after 5 minutes stir until smooth, leave to cool and thicken at room temperature
 unused ganache can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to a week, if you can resist just eating it with a spoon...

Sour Cherry Compote

jar of morello cherries
arrowroot (or tapioca flour)

Morello cherries only seem to be available in huge jars. Strain the cherries, retaining the juice in a measuring jug. I had about 250ml juice. 1 tablespoon of arrowroot will thicken 250ml liquid. If you don't want to use all your cherries, or have less liquid than me, just reduce the quantity of arrowroot accordingly; e.g. 1/2 tablespoon arrowroot for 125ml juice, 1 teaspoon of arrowroot for just over 60ml juice (62.5ml or 1/4 cup) etc.

 tip cherries and juice into a pan
 mix 1tbsp arrowroot with 1tbsp water, stir until smooth, then blend into cherries
 stir over a medium heat until thickened
 you'll probably have lots of cherries left over, you may have to make a cheesecake or a pie, I have wicked plans for mine :)


Milly, enjoying her creation, messy but so gooooood..!


Monday, 8 September 2014

Sherbet Lemon Marshmallows, scratch that, Passionfruit Marshmallows with Lemon Sherbet


Things have been pretty sweet this week, I've been taking part in "the sweet swap" organised by Aussie food bloggers Chew Town and Belly Rumbles. It works like this; I parcel up 3 packages of my chosen homemade sweet and post them off to my designated swappers; I then wait, impatiently, for my 3 packages to arrive.



They arrived over a week, on 3 separate days, I didn't open any until the last arrived, I like to prolong the surprise; deferred gratification, in kids it can indicate intelligence... It seems I underestimated the importance of packaging, the parcels I received were gorgeous! That overachieving Amanda at Chew Town even baked her own tags! I loved the contents just as much, 3 of my favourite things; chocolate, nuts and a honeycomb hybrid.  A perfect crunchy, hazelnutty ferrero rocher like chocolate from Julie at I Dream in Chocolate, gorgeous spiced pecan chocolate cups from Nicole at Seeking Victory, and a mad maple comb from Amanda at Chew Town. They were all sweetly delicious, a real treat.





Sherbet lemon marshmallows were my confection of choice, until i realised I'd bought passionfruit instead of lemons, who does that? So, passionfruit marshmallows with lemon sherbet. I love this marshmallow recipe, the texture is amazing, mousse like and spongy, never rubbery. They are super sweet, and paired with a fizzing lemon sherbet are quite something. To make lemon marshmallows, simply substitute the passionfruit juice in the recipe below with freshly squeezed and strained lemon juice. I sent my sherbety, marshmallowy packages off to Sara at Belly Rumbles, Simon at The Heart of Food, and Lucy at Bake Play Smile. I loved the image of the marshmallows Simon posted on instagram, I'd be lying through my teeth if I didn't admit it influenced my own :) thanks Simon!



Passionfruit Marshmallows


180ml strained passionfruit juice (approximately 10 large passion fruit)
20g powdered gelatin
500g caster sugar
2 egg whites
snow sugar* for dusting

  • lightly grease a  20cm by 25cm (or similar) cake pan and dust with snow sugar
  • combine passionfruit juice and gelatin in a bowl, set aside
  • combine caster sugar and 1 cup (250ml) water in a medium sized saucepan and cook over gentle heat, stirring, until sugar dissolves  increase heat to medium and cook until syrup reaches 125ºC on a sugar thermometer, approximately 10 minutes but you need to keep an eye on it  remove from heat, add passionfruit mixture to syrup and stir until gelatin dissolves, the mixture will bubble alarmingly!
  • meanwhile, using an electric mixer, whisk egg whites and a pinch of salt until frothy  gradually add passionfruit mixture, whisking continuously on medium speed until mixture has doubled in size  slowly decrease speed and mix until mixture is just warm
  • pour into prepared cake pan, spread evenly, then dust top with snow sugar 
  • stand at room temperature for around 3 hours or until firm, then release the marshmallow by running a knife around the edge of the tin and tipping it onto a board using a sharp knife, and a ruler if you have my OCD leanings, cut marshmallow into 4 by 5 cm rectangles and roll in snow sugar to coat  store in an airtight container between sheets of baking paper at room temperature for up to 2 weeks
  • when you are ready to serve, arrange on your serving dish, dust liberally with lemon sherbet, and finely zest a lemon over the top, watch them fizz then consume as soon as possible
* in Australia snow sugar is available from The Essential Ingredient but can be substituted with a 50/50 combination of icing sugar and corn flour (or potato starch for a gluten free alternative) 

makes approximately 25 large marshmallows

adapted slightly from Catherine Adams, Rockpool Melbourne


Lemon Sherbet

75g citric acid
95g icing sugar
1 tbsp bicarbonate of soda
1 lemon

  • combine the first 3 ingredients in a bowl, pass through a fine sieve 3 times
  • store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week
adapted from Lisa Featherby's recipe in the Australian Gourmet Traveller