Tuesday, 12 July 2022

apple charlotte

If you love apples and the crisp yet soft paradox of hot buttered toast, this is the dessert for you!  A charlotte is the autumn/winter edition of another English classic, the summer pudding, both feature fruit and fluffy white bread, but for me the charlotte has the edge with its crispy, buttery exterior and undeniable affinity with custard. 

Use your favourite apples, I went for a mixture of Granny Smith and Pink Lady. The apples are cooked down very slowly, intensifying their flavour, I don't add much sugar so the result can be quite tart, increase the sugar if you prefer, but not too much as you'll dull that wonderful apple-iness. 

This is an ideal recipe for a chilly day when you've no reason to leave the house, it's not particularly taxing, but does take time. Serve the charlotte hot from the oven with custard, cream, or ice cream, maybe all three, a hit of caramel sauce was a winner with a sweet toothed member of our house. Store leftovers covered in the fridge, they won't be pretty, but will reheat beautifully. 

Developed for Harris Farm Markets this recipe uses fruit from their Imperfect Picks range, bargain produce that saves fruit from landfill and supports our local farmers.




You'll need a 1 litre pudding basin.



apple charlotte

1.2kg apples
25ml lemon juice
50g caster sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla paste, or seeds of 1/2 vanilla bean
1 cinnamon stick
1 star anise
175g butter, divided into 60g and 115g
1 egg, separated
8-10 slices white bread

• add the lemon juice to a medium/large saucepan
• peel, core and dice the apples, add to the pan and toss in the lemon juice as you go. Once all the apples are in the pan add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon stick, star anise, and the 60g of butter. Cook very slowly on a low heat, stirring often, until the apples have broken down and the liquid has evaporated. Keep the heat low and take your time, you don't want the apples to brown; this took 40 minutes for me but could be more/less depending on the size of your pan and the juiciness of your apples. Take off the heat and leave to cool
• while the apples are cooking put the remaining 115g butter into a small pan. Melt the butter over a medium heat. The butter will bubble and a layer of foam should appear on the surface, keep boiling, the foam will form into clumps of milk solids that will sink to the bottom of the pan, keep heating, the butter stops bubbling once the water content has boiled off, this is the point we are aiming for. Take the pan off the heat and pour the clarified butter into a shallow bowl through a muslin lined sieve or coffee filter. Set aside while you prep the bread.
• use a serrated knife to cut the crusts from the bread slices. Cut a circle from one of the bread slices to fit the bottom of your pudding basin, you could eyeball this, but I gently pressed the base of the pudding basin into the slice of bread to leave an outline for me to cut around. Dip the bread round into the clarified butter, place it in the bottom of the basin, butter side down. Take 6 slices of bread and cut into thirds, dip the strips, one at a time, into the butter and place them vertically with the buttered side pressed to the pudding basin, overlap the slices as you work your way around, you may not need all of the strips. When the basin is fully lined with bread strips, lightly beat the egg white and use it to brush over the joins in the strips, lightly pressing them to seal.
• remove the cinnamon stick and star anise from the cooled apples, break the egg yolk with a fork, then beat it through the apples. Tip the apples into the bread lined basin, the use the remaining bread slices to form a lid, this time placing them butter side up. Fold the ends of the bread strips over the base, brush with egg white and press to seal.
• heat your oven to 200ºC (180ºC fan)
• find a plate/saucer that fits snuggly over the top of the pudding basin, cover with foil, brush the side that will touch the charlotte with clarified butter and sit it on top. Fill an oven safe bowl with pastry weights (I use dried red lentils!) and put that on top of the plate. Transfer the pudding/plate/bowl situation onto a baking tray and place in the oven. After 40 minutes remove the weighted bowl and plate, continue to cook the charlotte uncovered for another 15 minutes, or until golden brown.
• Remove the charlotte from the oven, let it rest for 5 minutes then invert it onto a plate and serve. I topped mine with a spoon of super thick cream and a couple of blackberries, simple but glorious!















Thursday, 7 July 2022

Chocolate Orange Swiss Roll Wreath

Merry Christmas! Hope this festive season is kind, what a couple of years it's been. Christmas baking is in full swing here; I started out making a Yule log, but took a detour along the way, and here we are with a wreath, I'm not disappointed. It's a terrific dessert for a celebration; it's pre-portioned, you can make it ahead, and takes up little of the highly contested, very precious fridge space.

The chiffon sponge is very light and flexible, and rolls really well. I made 2 rolls, one filled with vanilla swiss meringue buttercream, the other filled with chocolate swiss meringue buttercream. You'll need some berries for decoration, I used a punnet each of raspberries, strawberries, red currants and some very festive dried orange slices.


























sponge

35g cocoa powder
50g caster sugar
95g plain flour
5g baking powder (just over a teaspoon)
1/2 teaspoon salt
zest of an orange
110ml freshly squeezed orange juice
7 jumbo egg yolks
80g canola oil
1tsp vanilla paste
8 jumbo egg whites
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
butter for greasing

 preheat your oven to 150ºC, grease and line 2 swiss roll pans with baking paper, then lightly butter the paper
• combine the cocoa, flour, baking powder, and salt, sift into a the bowl of a stand mixer, if you have one, and with the paddle attachment mix through the 50g caster sugar 
• make a well in the centre of your flour mixture, add the orange zest and juice, egg yolks, oil and vanilla paste, mix until smooth
• in another, really large bowl whisk the 8 egg whites until foamy, add the cream of tartar then mix until you have soft peaks, gradually add the additional 50g caster sugar, whisking until you have firm peaks and the sugar has dissolved
• fold the egg whites into the batter in three stages
• divide the batter between the tins and bake for 12-15 minutes; check after 12 minutes, the cake should spring back when gently pressed, if not, put it back in for the extra few minutes
• leave the cakes in their tins for 5 minutes, then turn out onto cooling racks, remove the paper and leave for a further 5 minutes
• take a clean piece of baking paper, approximately 20cm longer than the cake, and place it on top of tone of the warm cakes, flip the cake and lay it on the paper on your bench, roll up the sponge from the short end with the paper inside, and leave to cool completely. Repeat with the other sponge.
• while the sponges cool, prepare the fillings
• carefully unwrap the cake rolls, spread one with the vanilla buttercream, roll the sponge into a log then wrap tightly in plastic wrap and place in the fridge to firm up. Repeat the process with the other cake roll and chocolate orange filling.
• give the rolls an hour in the fridge then make the ganache. Sit a wire rack over a tray, unwrap the cake rolls and place seam side down on the rack. Pour the ganache over the rolls and leave to set, the tray will catch the excess making clean up a little easier.  Once the ganache has firmed up, slice the rolls, place on your serving board in a wreath pattern, decorate with red berries, red currants and dried orange slices. Enjoy!!

Vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream

3 large egg whites
180g granulated sugar
230g butter, at room temperature, cubed
pinch salt
1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped

• combine the egg whites and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer, place over a pan of simmering water and whisk constantly until the temperature reaches 72ºC 
• return the bowl to the stand mixer and whisk on medium high until the mixtures cools, has doubled in size and forms stiff peaks (if you don't have a stand mixer, a hand held electric mixer will be fine, I wouldn't attempt by hand)
 add the butter a piece at a time, mixing to incorporate each piece, the mixture may look alarmingly curdled but keep mixing and it will magically come back together
• once all the butter is incorporated add the salt and vanilla bean seeds, mixing on slow until combined

Chocolate Orange Swiss meringue buttercream

3 large egg whites
180g granulated sugar
230g butter, at room temperature, cubed
pinch salt
1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped
85g chocolate (I used 60%), melted
1 tbsp finely zested orange zest 

• combine the egg whites and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer, place over a pan of simmering water and whisk constantly until the temperature reaches 72ºC 
• return the bowl to the stand mixer and whisk on medium high until the mixtures cools, has doubled in size and forms stiff peaks (if you don't have a stand mixer, a hand held electric mixer will be fine, I wouldn't attempt by hand)
 add the butter a piece at a time, mixing to incorporate each piece, the mixture may look alarmingly curdled but keep mixing and it will magically come back together
• once all the butter is incorporated add the salt, vanilla bean seeds, melted chocolate, and orange zest mixing on slow until combined

Ganache Coat

150g chocolate, finely chopped (again I used 60%)
110ml cream (approximately35% fat)

• tip the chopped chocolate into a heat proof jug
• pour the cream into a small pan and bring to the boil.
• pour the hot cream over the chocolate, stir to ensure all the chocolate is submerged, leave for 5 minutes then stir until smooth


Sunday, 22 May 2022

simple vanilla and orange no-bake cheesecake


I've been slow to embrace the cheesecake, but now I'm a convert. Baked or not, Basque style, made in a tray and cut into bars, I'm a fan. This is a really easy no bake cheesecake, wonderfully light, and so easy to adapt, a fabulous start for a cheesecake journey.



Vanilla and Orange no-bake Cheesecake
serves 12

250g scotch finger biscuits
100g butter, melted
zest of 1 orange, divided in 2
500g cream cheese, at room temperature
100g caster sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
2g gelatin
30ml boiling water
300ml thickened cream (approx 36% fat)
500g strawberries
250g raspberries
25g caster sugar
50ml orange liqueur
juice half an orange

• line the base of a 20cm springform cake pan with baking paper, lightly grease the inside
• break the biscuits into a food processor, blitz to fine crumbs. Add the melted butter and half of the orange zest, pulse until combined 
• tip the crumbs into the cake pan, give the pan a shake to level them out, use the base of a flat glass or similar to press the crumbs into the base and up the side of the pan, then pop in the fridge while you prepare the filling
• in a small bowl, sprinkle the gelatin over the boiling water, mix until evenly dissolved, set aside
• add the cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and remaining orange zest to the bowl of a stand mixer (a hand held electric mixer will work well too) use the paddle attachment to beat until smooth, then add the gelatin and beat until combined
• whip the cream to soft peaks, then fold 1/3 through the cream cheese mixture to loosen, gently fold in the remaining cream, then pour over the crust. Use an off set palette knife or the back of a spoon to smooth the top, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours
• half an hour before you want to serve the cheesecake, take it out of the fridge and prepare the berries
• remove the stalks and cut the strawberries in half. Combine half of the strawberries, and half of the raspberries in a bowl with the caster sugar, orange liqueur and orange juice, keep at room temperature, lightly tossing every five minutes or so. When you are ready to serve, add the remaining berries to the bowl, stir briefly to combine
• heap some berries on top of the cheesecake, and serve with the extra berries on the side
• store leftover cheesecake in an airtight container in the fridge; the cheesecake will keep for 4 days, provided the use by dates on the cream and cream cheese do not expire before





Tuesday, 5 April 2022

coconut custard scrolls



Coconut custard scrolls, made from a soft pillowy dough, swirled with sweet coconut custard, then shaped like bunnies for a fun Easter treat! The dough is super soft thanks to the tangzhong method, and can be tricky to handle, so while you could skip the chilling stage, I don't recommend it!

coconut custard

320 ml milk
30g desiccated coconut
3 egg yolks
75g caster sugar
25g cornflour
1/2 tsp vanilla paste
25g butter

• tip the milk and coconut into a small saucepan, bring to a simmer, then turn off the heat and leave to steep for an hour. Strain into a measuring jug, you'll need 270ml of milk, discard any excess, if your coconut was super thirsty you may need to top up with a little extra milk. Give the pan a quick clean, then bring the 270ml milk to a simmer
• meanwhile whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, cornflour and vanilla; set the bowl on a damp cloth to stop it dancing around, gradually add the hot milk, whisking enthusiastically
• tip the custard mixture back into the pan, and with the heat on low, whisk continuously. The custard will thicken quickly, once it starts to bubble, whisk for another minute then take off the heat. Add the butter, whisking until smooth
• push the custard through a sieve into a small bowl, cover with plastic wrap pressed onto the surface of the custard, then place in the fridge to cool.




dough

for the tangzhong:
30g bread flour
130 ml milk

240ml milk
25g sugar
6g yeast
360g bread flour
5g salt
60g butter, at room temperature

coconut custard icing, recipe below
icing sugar, for decoration
20g shredded coconut


• thangzhong: combine the flour and water in a small saucepan, over medium heat, whisk until the mixture forms a thick paste
• transfer the flour paste to the bowl of a stand mixture, leave to cool for 10 minutes. Add the milk, sugar, yeast, flour and salt, using the dough hook, mix on the lowest setting for a couple of minutes. Increase the speed slightly and continue mixing for an additional 10 minutes.  Add the butter and mix for a further 5-7 minutes until the dough is smooth, shiny and elastic 
• transfer the dough to a greased container, cover and place in the fridge to proof overnight, it should double in size
• line two baking trays with baking paper
• take the coconut custard of the fridge, give it a quick whisk to smooth it out, put 100g of custard in a medium sized bowl, cover and return to the fridge
• tip the chilled dough onto a floured bench, divide in half, return one half to the fridge
• roll the half portion of dough into a rectangle approximately 24cmx40cm
• spread half of the remaining custard over the dough rectangle, leaving a 1cm gap at the top edge, roll the dough away from you to form a 24cm log, keep the roll as tight as possible. Carefully lift the log onto a baking tray or chopping board, lightly cover and pop in the fridge for 20 minutes or so
• meanwhile, take the remaining portion of dough, roll on a lightly floured sheet of baking paper into a 32cmx24cm rectangle, spread the other half of the custard over the bottom half of the rectangle, fold the top over the custardy half, giving you a 32cmx12cm custard/dough sandwich. Use the baking paper to lift the dough onto a board or tray and chill in the fridge for 20 minutes
• remove the log from the fridge, and divide into 8 equal pieces, use a sharp serrated knife or dental floss for the neatest cuts. Place 4 scrolls on each lined baking tray, give them lots of space
• remove the dough rectangle from the fridge, use a pizza wheel to cut into 16 2cmx12cm strips, these are the bunny ears. Give each scroll 2 ears, dabbing the scroll with a little water to stick the ears in place. Cover each tray with plastic wrap and leave to proof in a warm spot for 30-40 minutes
• heat your oven to 180ºC fan and bake the scrolls for 25 minutes. 
• remove the scrolls from the oven, cool on the trays for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely
• dust your bunny scrolls with icing sugar, then pipe a blob of icing in the centre of each scroll, top with shredded coconut to form the fluffy bunny tails
• scrolls are best eaten as soon as possible, store any leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge, allow to come to room temperature before eating



coconut custard icing

100g coconut custard, reserved earlier, at room temperature
60g cream cheese, at room temperature
20g icing sugar

• combine the ingredients in a medium, beat until smooth
















































Recipe developed for Harris Farm Markets

Sunday, 13 March 2022

coconut tres leches cake



Tres leches cake is a Latin American delight, an airy sponge cake soaked with a mixture of 3 milks; condensed, evaporated and regular. The cake is essentially a chiffon sponge, be still my beating heart, and requires a little babying to achieve its airy lightness. A plain aluminium 8 by 2 inch sandwich pan is ideal, you want the cake to stick to the pan; once cooked the cake is inverted to cool, then cut from the pan. It's worth the fiddling, after its overnight in the fridge you'll have a cake that's wonderfully soft and light, creamy and moist, so moist it sometimes sits in a puddle, yet slices like a dream. It's a conundrum, and I'm happily confounded.

I used to steer well clear of "soggy sponge" but this, like tiramisu and the famed flour and stone lamington is not wet, but more damp, with a beautifully soft texture equally suited to a fork or spoon. This version is flavoured with coconut extract and vanilla, swaps the evaporated milk for coconut milk, and is topped with whipped cream and crisp toasted coconut flakes, tres leches, tres coco! 

Take care with the milk mixture, the thickness of both the coconut and condensed milk can vary. You are looking for the consistency of regular pouring (single) cream, adjust as you go, thinning with regular milk where necessary, but remember to use a maximum of 210ml for the soak.

This cake was developed for Harris Farm Markets all the ingredients can be found in store, and home delivered, which is fabulous if like us you are stuck in covid isolation...

 


cake:

3 eggs, separated
120g caster, halved
80g plain flour
3/4 tsp (3g) baking powder
pinch salt
1/2 tsp vanilla paste
1/2 tsp coconut extract
55ml full fat milk
200ml thickened cream, whipped to soft peaks
2 tbsp (10g) coconut flakes
2 tbsp (10g) desiccated coconut

soak:

90ml coconut milk
90ml condensed milk
30ml milk

• preheat oven to 170ºC fan, cut a circle of baking paper to fit a not non stick 8 inch sandwich cake pan, set aside
• whisk egg whites on medium high to soft peaks, slowly add 60g caster sugar and whisk to firm peaks
• tip the flour, baking powder and salt into a small bowl, whisk briefly to combine
• in another bowl, use a stand mixer with the paddle attachment if you have one, beat the egg yolks with the remaining 60g of sugar until pale, thick and creamy. Add the vanilla paste, coconut extract, and milk, mix to combine, then sift in the flour mixture, and mix until smooth
• add 1/3 egg whites to the batter, fold through, add the remaining egg whites, gently folding until there are no streaks of white
• drop a heaped teaspoon of cake batter into the cake pan, use a pastry brush to spread almost to the edge, then press the baking paper on top. Tip the cake batter into the pan, bake in the centre of your oven for 20-25 minutes, until a cake tester comes out cleanly
• remove the cake from the oven and immediately invert the pan onto a wire rack to cool. Cooling the cake upside down helps prevent it shrinking, keeping the cake super light and moist
• while the cake cools, make the soak. Whisk the 3 milks together until smooth, set aside
• when the cake has cooled completely, run a sharp knife around the inside of the cake tin, then ease a palette knife down the side of the cake and between the baking paper and the base of the tin, gently wiggling to lever the cake out
• set the cake aside while you wash and dry the cake tin, then return the cake to the tin and carefully poke all over with a skewer. Pour half of the milk mix over the cake, leave to soak for 5 minutes, then pour the remaining milk over. Cover the cake and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, overnight is ideal.
• half and hour or so before you want to serve the cake, spread the coconut flakes and desiccated coconut onto a lined baking tray, toast in a 180ºC fan oven for 5-10 minutes until lightly golden, watch like a hawk as it colours very quickly, leave to cool 
• when you ready to serve, top the cake with the whipped cream and sprinkle with toasted coconut
• keep leftovers covered in the fridge for up to 3 days







Friday, 11 February 2022

orange and cardamon soft gingerbread cookies



These soft gingerbread cookies have been my Christmas favourite for a while now, ignored by the kids and my powdered ginger avoidant husband. Until now. The kids got into this batch, they didn't last 24 hours, we're making more tomorrow.

There are so many beautiful treats to make for the festive season, here's why these should be up the top of your list...
  • orange and cardamom are best friends, so nostalgically festive
  • the cookie texture is amazing, soft with a hint of chew
  • the cookies are spicy and not overly sweet, balanced perfectly by the sweet orange glaze 
  • stamping cookies is so much fun, craft and baking!
  • they are just so pretty

I used Nordic ware cookie stamps from Williams Sonoma, they have so many beautiful designs are very easy to use, you'll also need a plain round cutter, the same size, or just larger than the stamp. The smaller cookies I stamped with snowflake plungers then used a plain round cutters to cut them out. I can't remember where I bought them, but a quick google search should provide lots of options :)




cookies

250g plain flour
1 tbsp cocoa powder
1/2 tsp bicarb soda
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/2 to 1 tsp ground cardamom, use the full teaspoon if you love a strong cardamom flavour
1/4 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tsp salt
90g unsalted butter, at room temp
100g brown sugar
100g treacle
1 jumbo egg yolk
zest of an orange, use half here, save half for the glaze

• combine the dry ingredients in a bowl, then sift twice to evenly combine, set aside
• put the butter, brown sugar, orange zest, and treacle into the bowl of a stand mixer, add the treacle last to avoid it sticking to the bottom of the bowl. Using the paddle beater, mix on medium/low to combine, scraping the bowl a couple of times as you go
• turn the mixer down to its lowest speed and slowly tip in the dry ingredients. Mix until the mixture starts to clump and there are no dry spots in the bowl, tip onto a lightly floured bench and gently knead until it comes together. Pat the dough into a disc, place onto a lightly floured sheet of baking paper, dust the dough disc with flour and roll out to 5mm thick. Slide the dough on its paper onto a baking tray and place into the fridge for 30 minutes to firm up
• preheat the oven to 190ºC  (170ºC fan) and line 2 trays with baking paper
• dip your cookie stamp in flour, tap off the excess, and press firmly into the dough, pressing in a circular motion will help for detailed patterns, carefully remove the stamp, then use a circular cutter to cut out the cookie and place on the baking tray, continue with remaining dough, re-roll the excess dough and repeat the stamping process
• bake cookies for 8-10 minutes, until they are firm when gently pressed, cool on the tray for 5 minutes  
• while the cookies cool, prepare the glaze, then use a pastry brush to paint the still warm cookies
• allow to cool completely, then store in an airtight container. The cookies will keep for 3 days, they'll be good for an additional couple of days, but the glaze may crack and start to fall off, still delicious!




glaze

75g icing sugar
10g butter, melted
zest of half an orange
30-50ml orange juice

• sift the icing sugar into a bowl, add the melted butter, orange zest and 1 tablespoon of orange juice, mix until combined and lump free, adding more orange juice as required to give the same consistency as the treacle used in the cookies, use immediately








passion fruit, raspberry and brownie tart





I have no idea what to call this, it's not a tart, and definitely not a cake. There's a fudgey brownie disc, heaped with raspberries, hidden beneath a light and tangy passionfruit bavarois. It's simple, elegant, and tastes amazing; passion fruit, raspberry and chocolate are so good together, sweet and tart, rich and mellow. If setting a layer of brownie and berries inside a mousse sounds a bit much, just chop the brownie into cubes, then layer in a dish with the berries and bavarois, a trifle of sorts, go for individual glasses if you're feeling extra.



passion fruit, raspberry brownie bavarois

chocolate brownie, recipe below
passionfruit bavarois, recipe below
250g raspberries

• grease and line the sides of an 8 inch (20cm) springform cake pan with baking paper or acetate
• place the brownie disc in the centre of the cake pan, there will be an approximately 1cm gap between the brownie and the side of the pan
• the brownie should have slightly raised edges forming a shallow bowl, fill the hollow with a layer of raspberries, keeping the leftover berries for serving
• carefully pour the bavarois over the raspberry heaped brownie, it should level itself, give it a gentle shake to help it along 
• cover and return to the fridge to set, approximately 6 hours
• take the bavarois brownie out of the fridge half an hour before you want to serve it; unclip the side of the cake pan, carefully peel away the paper or acetate, leave the bavarois on the base of the cake pan and place it on a serving plate, top with the reserved raspberries and enjoy!
• to cut a neat slice, fill a tall glass with very hot water, dip a sharp knife in the hot water, wipe dry then slice away, wiping and dipping between each cut
• cover any leftovers and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. 


brownie disc

30g butter
115g semi sweet chocolate, chopped
1 extra large egg
70g caster sugar
1/4 tsp vanilla paste
pinch espresso powder (optional)
25g plain flour
1/8 tsp baking powder
pinch salt
60g chocolate chips, milk or dark

• grease a 7 inch (18cm) round, shallow cake tin, line the base with baking paper
• preheat the oven to 170ºC
• tip the chocolate and butter into a small pan, stir occasionally until melted and combined, set aside to cool
• beat the egg, sugar, and vanilla together until light and fluffy, add the melted butter/chocolate, and fold gently to combine
• sift together the espresso powder, flour, baking powder and salt, toss the chocolate chips in the floury mixture, then add to the batter and fold through
• tip the batter into the prepared pan and bake for 20 minutes, remove from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool completely
• the brownie should have slightly raised edges, forming a shallow bowl to fill with raspberries


passionfruit bavarois

100ml milk
5 jumbo egg yolks
200g caster sugar
150 ml passion fruit juice (approximately 12 passion fruit)*
3 titanium gelatine leaves
300ml thick cream, whipped to soft peaks

• pop the milk in a medium pan and bring to a simmer, meanwhile whisk the egg yolks and sugar until pale and creamy, add the passion fruit juice, then slowly stream in the hot milk, whisking as you go. Return to the pan, over a low heat, stir continually until the custard thickens and coats the back of a spoon, this can take up to 10 minutes, depending how brave/reckless you are with the heat, take off the heat
• soak the gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water for 5 minutes, squeeze out the excess water, then add to the hot custard and stir to dissolve. Pour through a sieve into a clean bowl, and pop into the fridge for a hour, give it a quick whisk every 10 minutes to prevent it setting around the edges
• after an hour the custard will have almost set, take it out of the fridge, whisk to smooth it out, then using your whisk, fold in the whipped cream

* quick tip for juicing passion fruit; half the passion fruit and scrape the pulp into a food processor, give it a few quick pulses then strain through a sieve. Take care not to over process or you will find gritty seed fragments in the juice.